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Signtist

@Signtist@lemm.ee

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Signtist ,
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Hard to work the guillotine when everyone's suffering from great stroke.

Signtist ,
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As soon as I saw this I thought "Get this man some iodine, stat! Or, conversely, stop giving this man so much iodine!"

Signtist ,
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It's important to define was "equal" is in this context. Some people hear "equal" and think they must measure exactly the same in every test, but that's not how the word is being used in this context. It's more that people are so varied from one person to another that no test can truly judge them well enough to differentiate them when it comes to inherent worth.

One person might measure above another in one test, but there are surely many others where the results would be flipped. There are so many different things you could test a person on that in the end none of them really matter; any one measurement is like trying to figure out what an extinct animal looked like from a single tiny piece of a fossil.

That's what the IQ test is doing - it's taking one tiny piece of human intelligence, which itself is one tiny piece of what might be said to make up a person's value, and trying to use that to extrapolate information about them that simply can't be taken from such a 1-dimensional test. It's not worthless, but it needs to be paired with a bunch of other tests before it can really say anything, and even then it wouldn't say much.

Signtist ,
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This is a great point. The results of an IQ test aren't really measuring a person, they're measuring a byproduct of that person, which is significantly less informative.

Signtist ,
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Coldplay was one of the big popular bands back in the 2000's, and like any popular band, there were plenty of people eager to prove how cool they were by telling everyone that they hate their music. Social media was starting to get popular at the time, so people would take to Facebook to make their "Coldplay sucks" proclamations. As social media took off, the sentiment kinda got swept up with it, and so now even as Coldplay isn't anywhere near as relevant as they were back then, it's still a pretty common thing to see people say they suck online. From what I saw, Nickelback's wave came afterward, and while that sentiment reached higher popularity in its heyday, it hasn't stuck around as well.

Signtist ,
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The public hate definitely got worse in the later 2000's, but it was definitely still popular among middle/high schoolers to tell everyone they hated songs like Yellow and Fix You to show how "sophisticated" their tastes were. It was the same for any band that got too popular, but I remember that when Facebook opened up to people without .edu emails in 2006 I saw the Coldplay hate all over the place. One of the first online arguments I ever had was because someone said that the song The Scientist sucked, and I was really into it at the time. It's part of why I chose my username, along with my love of biology.

Signtist ,
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The original story was written to convince children to settle for the life they have, rather than risk their livelihood searching for something different. The Disney version was modified to fit a more stereotypical "American Dream" lesson that believes making your own life can be rewarding.

The same story, but with differing endings for differing lessons following the differing mindsets of differing places at differing times. It's fun to think about how much a children's story can be changed to reflect the lesson its teller means to teach.

Signtist ,
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Hmm, I'm not sure I agree with that.

By teaching kids that pushing against the "natural order" of the world gets you killed, and that you should just stay in your preassigned life designation, you're not hardening them, you're teaching them that rising up and fighting back is useless, and will only get you killed. The original story was meant to keep kids in line, and I think we've got enough propaganda keeping people in line at the moment.

Maybe the Disney version only made the ending nicer to be more palatable to a modern audience, but the lesson that a better life can be attained by persevering through challenges is a sentiment that I can definitely support instilling in the younger generation.

Signtist ,
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The issue with allowing it to simply crumble away is that the last people to die will be the ones exploiting the system, as they have the resources and the power to stay alive the longest. If you want the people who would rebuild society into one that is better than what we already have to still be around when all is said and done, we need to tear it down ourselves.

Signtist ,
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Looks like a mall I'd frequent a lot in Grand Forks, ND in college. It always looked run down, but it had really nice little shops in it. Basically a haven for local small businesses that couldn't afford their own building.

Signtist ,
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I want to tell people this sometimes, but I figure they'll just think I'm mansplaining mansplaining.

Signtist ,
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Same! I had a few leg surgeries as a kid and liked to cover the scars, but even now that they're faded, I like just picking out some jeans and not having to think about it. I've never really had an issue with my legs getting too hot, either, though where I live it's cold more often than not.

Signtist ,
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You don't come to this conclusion if you're the kind of person to trust legitimate sources of information.

Signtist ,
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I remember when the first wave of stimulus checks went out and a bunch of car dealerships suddenly raised the price on their cars by $1000. UBI would be great, but if we don't reign in the corporate-apologist economy first, every product will suddenly be more expensive so they can bleed people of that extra money.

Signtist ,
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Exactly. If a small group of people are given UBI, then they just have more money, and stores want to profit from everyone, including the people who aren't getting more money. But if everyone gets UBI, then the stores are sure that their customers can afford higher prices, and our current government has shown that it doesn't care if prices are arbitrarily inflated. I'd love UBI, but it can't function alone without accompanying laws to prevent price hiking.

Signtist ,
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It will, yeah, but I think people will be a lot less worried about others succeeding when they themselves are succeeding as well. But maybe I'm underestimating the country's racism. I hope I'm not.

Signtist ,
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You're right, it's not... Too bad most places have realized they can just raise prices together and share in the extra profits, rather than compete with one another. There's a reason why price fixing is illegal, and there's a reason why the government rarely enforces it.

Signtist ,
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Sweet! I sure hope the inflation wouldn't completely invalidate the extra income, but I still have very little faith in American capitalism allowing for there to be money not immediately being funneled into the bank accounts of the 1%.

Signtist ,
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If I was buying Ritz crackers for $4 before, maybe now they're $5. I'm making more money, and it's just $1, so I might not even be paying enough attention to notice, but if everything goes up by a similar amount, then I'm spending significantly more on the same items than I was before, and might end up dropping $100 of my new UBI money on groceries without even making a change in my shopping habits.

Now, a lower income person might be buying store brand crackers that only cost $2, but now they're $3, so the same situation occurs.

These are hypothetical numbers of course, but I wouldn't be surprised if a situation like that occurred, given that every company would know exactly how much more money is now in everyone's pockets. Every product goes up just a bit, just to take a bit of that UBI pie.

Signtist ,
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I certainly hope you're right. All I picture is the dollar stores suddenly becoming $2 stores as everything just shifts to be more expensive with very few people improving their financial situation at all.

Signtist ,
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Doesn't that just further validate my concerns? Prices are going up to gouge people even when a lot of people don't have the cash to pay for it. I see no reason why a landlord charging $15,000 a year won't just up it to $25,000 a year when everyone gets a $10k UBI. The government seems to care very little about preventing things like that.

Signtist ,
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I understand that there are solutions that could fix this, I just don't think the US government as it is now would be willing to enact or enforce them even if it went ahead with UBI. That's why my initial post said we need to figure out these things before UBI, or else we'll enact it without things like taxes for vacant units or rent control between renters, and it'll fail, killing any enthusiasm for another attempt following potential law changes to fix the issues.

Signtist , (edited )
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Essentially. They can't freely change rent for current tenants since they need to stay within the confines of whatever lease was agreed upon, but they can make rent whatever they want for new tenants, so it's not an uncommon occurrence for them to simply stop fixing things in a timely manner so that current tenants feel compelled to leave, and then they can fill the space, charging whatever they feel someone will pay for rent after that. It's scummy, and it's technically illegal, but everyone knows they won't really get in trouble for it.

Signtist ,
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Well, once the lease is over people have to sign a new one anyway, so even existing tenants can only lock in rates for so long. And when one landlord ups rent, it's usually because all the other landlords are doing it too - it seems like they do it in unison, I imagine because they don't want to have to worry about people leaving for somewhere cheaper. I'm not sure if it's illegal like price fixing or not, but it doesn't seem to make a difference in the end.

Signtist ,
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The moment he moves to one of his 27 other stores that haven't been taken down: he he.

Signtist ,
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Ultimately, it should be a law. Companies will always want to exploit their workers whenever possible, and the entire point of a government is to enforce the will of the people against things like corporations that are too big for any single person to fight. It's basically the concept of "If you're not doing anything wrong, you have nothing to fear," but applying it to companies instead of people, because the people should be free, not the corporations.

Signtist ,
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My wife didn't even do drivers' ed, since she didn't get her license until after high school. She just had to pass a test and got her license that day. I did the whole drivers' ed thing, but it barely prepared me at all, and I ended up getting into 2 accidents while still in high school since I just didn't have the experience to deal with unusual situations, and I locked up when I happened to get into a couple dangerous situations. Luckily we're both experienced drivers by now 10+ years later, but yeah, those first few years are basically just learning how to drive by driving, being a danger to everyone.

Signtist ,
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Tailgaters. I was terrified that if I slowed down too quickly they'd smash into me, so one time I took a turn too fast and crashed into a car I couldn't see because of a hedge, and the other I didn't brake quickly enough to stop for a guy who suddenly realized he wanted to take a left turn right then. I eventually told myself that if tailgaters crash into me, that's their problem for being so close behind me, and I just need to focus on what I'm doing.

Signtist ,
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Yeah, we'd be a hell of a lot closer to true equality if groups of people who are among those who need help the most were already truly receiving it.

Unfortunately, the world as it's currently designed only allows people to live well if they take from others, and those who are prepared to do that have long since realized they live a lot longer if they convince the people they're stepping on that it's the guy next to them they should hate, not the guy on top of them.

Signtist ,
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At the end of the day, it'll just be the people in charge of whatever band of rebels comes out on top, and whatever local faction of them ends up in power across the country as a result of that. That's all the founding fathers of the US were. We like to think of them as heroes, but they and their constituents were just the guys who got to choose who was a traitor and who wasn't. History painted the winners more colorfully than they were, as it always does.

I'm sure the birth of my country was a terrifying time for anyone who wasn't squarely proven to be aligned with the revolution, and the same will be true when people have had enough in modern times as well.

Signtist ,
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I'm certainly not religious, but I understand that a lot of people use religion to supplement a lacking support network. Yes, they should find healthier ways to receive the support they need, but if you force them to abandon their religion without having another source of support to replace it, they're going to feel very isolated and scared, possibly leading to tears. Especially if their son forced them into that situation and then immediately left, showing complete disregard for their feelings.

Signtist ,
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Yeah, I could see it being an issue for some less-common type of indicator, but everyone who drives knows what a blinker looks like. Nobody would mistake it for anything other than the right hand turn signal.

Hell, I wouldn't even notice the shape of the light; all you need to notice while driving is the presence of a flashing light on the right side of the vehicle - if you're looking intently enough to notice the shape of the light, you're not paying enough attention to everything else on the road.

Signtist ,
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If you're driving in the dark with someone whose entire taillight system is out to the point where you can't immediately tell if his blinker is on the left or the right, you need to hit the brakes and put as much distance between you and them as you can... Then get better headlights, because even in that situation you should still be able to see them pretty well just with your own lights.

Signtist ,
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Dude, if your headlights aren't enough to illuminate what's in front of you, then it's not that an upgrade would be too much, it's that an upgrade would get you to the bare minimum... You literally NEED to be able to see what else is on the road with you at ALL TIMES. You're complaining about the risk that a vaguely arrow-shaped blinker causes in the specific case where you literally can't see the car it's attached to. There's a much bigger risk there, and while it's not your fault, it's definitely something your vehicle needs to have the tools to deal with.

There have been times where I was driving near someone who forgot to turn their headlights on at night. But that's the thing - I knew they were there; I could see their car with the light from my headlights, and even in that dangerously-low vision, I could easy tell which side of their car a blinker came on from. Yes, I got off the road and waited a bit to make sure they weren't near me anymore, but even in the time that I had to drive with them, I had the tools to resolve the situation safely for me.

Signtist ,
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You think that headlights that can illuminate cars ahead of you are the equivalent to those shitty aftermarket LED floodlights? Really? If your car can't see a dark car on the road with its lights off, you're a much, MUCH bigger idiot than someone with a union jack blinker...

Signtist ,
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You're absolutely right that circumstances aren't always perfect... Which is exactly why you need a vehicle that can maximize safety in all situations. A union jack blinker is dumb, but if you're EVER in a situation where you can't tell what side of a car a blinker is going off on, you're in a situation where you need to pull off to the side of the road, turn off your car, and call for someone to pick you up.

I've driven for tens of thousands of hours in my lifetime so far, and I've never even been close to a situation like what you've described. Even in a snow squall or dense fog I've always been able to see where other nearby cars on the road are, and where their blinkers are. Not being able to do so goes well beyond "not ideal;" that's well past the line of too dangerous. And the fact that THAT is how extreme your scenario has to get before the union jack becomes a considerable issue shows how much more concerning your scenario is than that one.

Signtist ,
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I'm not saying to get overly bright lights. I have no idea why you keep talking about overly bright lights. When I'm not driving for work, I drive a '94 corolla with stock headlights. But even with those, I can see dark obstacles that are way ahead of me on the road. I've encountered deer, turtles, pedestrians, and all sorts of random stuff that fell off of people's cars. There's so much on the road that needs to be illuminated, even if all the other cars have working lights. The fact that you can so nonchalantly bring up a scenario in which you can't even see another car, much less all the other stuff that might show up on the roads, makes me highly concerned for the state of your vehicle. That scenario is so insanely rare and dangerous that I can't understand how you can just throw it out there like it's no big deal.

It's NOT NORMAL to be unable to see a car on the road that's close enough to you where you need to see where their blinker are. Please, if you drive in that scenario often enough to bring it up like it's a realistic thing that someone could reasonably encounter more than once in a lifetime, bring your car to a mechanic before you cause a huge accident.

Signtist ,
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It's amazing how many people I meet who think so highly of the American revolution, but are completely aghast at the idea of fighting against the government now.

Signtist ,
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Don't Speak by No Doubt.

It was the first time I actively listened to a sad song, and while I was only 4 or so, and couldn't really understand what the lyrics were about, I remember the emotion feeling so powerful. The radio station that played it went off air when I was 5, and I cried about it a lot. To this day I gravitate toward sad songs; there's just something about minor chords that I can't get enough of.

Signtist ,
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I'd listen to that song on repeat as a kid just for the piano section at the end.

Signtist ,
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The issue with that sentiment is that a significant amount of the population simply can't afford to be picky. They buy the cheapest available version of whatever they need because that's what they can afford. All of the power of consumer choice is slowly being stripped away as more and more people are pushed into poverty, and that's by design.

Signtist ,
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I remember growing up in the 90's, my classmates and I all thought that one of the other kids was a liar because he said he didn't have a yard (he lived in an apartment). It didn't make sense - everyone else in the class of 30+ kids lived in a house with a yard, so he must just be making stuff up. Obviously that's anecdotal evidence, but still. It was weird for a kid not to live in a single-family home back then.

Signtist ,
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In the context of people who hack their systems? I'd certainly say so.

Signtist ,
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... I can't tell if you're serious or not, but if you're honestly so put-off by human connection and comradery, I'm disappointed. Kind of a weird take from someone on Lemmy if that's the case, though.

Signtist ,
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Haha, we're in a digital age, buddy. Computers are nothing more than the latest way to connect real people in real ways. Sure, bots exist, just like spam telephone callers exist and were probably major issues when that was the main way for people to connect with one another across large distances, but you're not going to stop it by covering your ears and denying the existence of every person you can't physically see.

I have a wife and family, I have friends, and I have online communities I care about; they're all just different legitimate social circles. We may not have evolved for it, but we're living it anyway, and the faster you adapt to that, the better.

Signtist ,
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Signtist ,
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You can literally see that it's a jpeg. Whatever, man. At this point you're just trolling. But hey, that's one of those human interactions that the internet made possible, so thanks for highlighting that for me.

Signtist ,
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As I mentioned, I have a wife who I live with and spend time with every day. We met online, and only later realized that we went to the same school, but were in different grades. We probably saw each other on multiple occasions, but we were just strangers then. I also have plenty of local friends who I spend time with as well. However, I live in completely different states from some of my oldest friends from school. We voice chat online every week, and meet up in person every few years.

I have a couple groups of people who I play video games and tabletop games with online who I've never even seen in real life, and wouldn't even recognize walking down the street, but we've known each other for years and have real, meaningful connections. Two of the friends from one group even realized they live near one another, and have since begun dating, making plans to move in together soon.

And yes, I am a part of several online communities in forums, sites like Lemmy, and elsewhere that I keep up with. We have nice conversations and heated arguments. We help each other with problems and questions. We're simply a group that any member knows they can turn to when they need to connect with someone.

Life is complicated, and there are an insane amount of different ways to connect with people. Amazingly, some of those are through the internet. The idea that some connections are real and the others are fake is complete bullshit, and you're clearly making a bad argument in bad faith to let off some steam.

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