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Kallioapina

@Kallioapina@lemm.ee

Finnish oddovert

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Kallioapina ,
@Kallioapina@lemm.ee avatar

Not quite so simple, but makes things certainly easier.

"As an EU citizen, you have the right to move to any EU country to live, work, study, look for a job or retire.

You can stay in another EU country for up to 3 months without registering there but you may need to report your presence. The only requirement is to hold a valid national identity card or passport. If you want to stay longer than 3 months, you may need to register your residence.

In many EU countries, you need to carry an identity card or passport with you at all times. In these countries, you could be fined or temporarily detained if you leave your identity documents at home - but you cannot be forced to return to your home country for this reason alone. "

https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/residence/residence-rights/index_en.htm#eu-citizen

Kallioapina , (edited )
@Kallioapina@lemm.ee avatar

That residency status is all conditional in many ways:

As an EU citizen, you have the right to move to any EU country for a period of up to 3 months as long as you have a valid identity card or passport. If you want to settle in another EU country but you have no intention to take up any work or education there, you need to prove that you:

have sufficient resources for you and your family during the time you want to stay in your new country
have comprehensive health insurance

Reporting your presence and registering your residence

During the first 3 months of your stay in your new country, as an EU citizen, you cannot be required to apply for a residence document confirming your right to live there - although in some countries you may have to report your presence upon arrival.

After 3 months in your new country, you may be required to register your residence with the relevant authority (often the town hall or local police station), and to be issued with a registration certificate.

You will need a valid identity card or passport and:

proof of comprehensive health insurance
proof you can support yourself without needing social assistance benefits: resources may come from any source, including from a third person.

Can you be requested to leave or be deported?

You may live in the other EU country as long as you continue to meet the conditions for residence. If you no longer do so, the national authorities may require you to leave.

In exceptional cases, your host country can deport you on grounds of public policy or public security - but only if it can prove you represent a genuine, present and sufficiently serious threat affecting one of the fundamental interests of society.

The deportation decision or the request to leave must be given to you in writing. It must state all the reasons for your deportation and specify how you can appeal and by when.
Permanent residence

If you have lived legally, meeting the conditions to stay in another EU country for a continuous period of 5 years, you automatically acquire the right of permanent residence there. This means that you can stay in the country as long as you want, you are entitled to be treated as a national of that country and you enjoy more protection against deportation. You can apply for a document certifying permanent residence.

Your continuity of residence is not affected by:

temporary absences (less than 6 months per year)
longer absences for compulsory military service
one absence of 12 consecutive months, for important reasons such as pregnancy and childbirth, serious illness, work, vocational training or a posting to another country.

You can lose your right to permanent residence if you live outside the country for more than 2 consecutive years.

https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/residence/residence-rights/index_en.htm#inactive-citizens-1

Going with a non chalant attitude of 'lel I think I'm just gonna go live on the other side of EU now' will land you in some trouble in most cases, what ever your personal alleged experience is.

Better be prepared with the proper info than leave it to luck and feels.

Kallioapina ,
@Kallioapina@lemm.ee avatar

As a finn that had to deal with a week long Erasmus university intense course with mostly german masters students... Yeah, americans of the Europe was the exact impression I got. Everyone else from all the other participant nationalities were respectful and professional, but the german students just couldnt.

Gods, I fucking hated to see the eyes of shame in the german professors faces watching their students go through their shenannigans and fits. My previous stereotype of germans as a nationality or as a culture being rational and collected died very quickly during that week.

Sorry for any germans reading this, but I consider you as the Americans of the EU after that experience.

Helldivers 2’s Politics Appear To Be Flying Over The Heads Of Some ( www.forbes.com )

There is currently a very funny, kind of sad dust-up over Helldivers 2, in which self-proclaimed “anti-woke” gamers have previously heralded it as a rare game where they believe “politics” does not play a factor. Their faith was been shaken by an Arrowhead community manager they believed they found to be (gasp)...

Kallioapina ,
@Kallioapina@lemm.ee avatar

A skinny joined the squad in the Roughnecks cartoon. It seems that you missed the whole cartoon.

Kallioapina ,
@Kallioapina@lemm.ee avatar

Currently I'm rewatching Stargate SG-1. It has held time surprisingly well. Lets see if I agree with concurrent watching of Atlantis when I get to those seasons, which I thought a little silly at the time.

Kallioapina ,
@Kallioapina@lemm.ee avatar

Please add sources to this infographic, maybe in the lower section, and this can be used as an actual, tactical weapon in everyday interactions.

And no, this comment is not an attempted underhanded attack against this infographic. People are taught in modern global world to trust researched sources. It's an rhetorical weapon, even if based on truth (which I hope this infographic is based on).

And no, I'm not a fucking LLM. Im just finnish and a little bit drunk.

Kallioapina ,
@Kallioapina@lemm.ee avatar

With agressive and paranoid attitudes like that, and in your other comments, youre better off staying in the states. We dont need that bs here.

Respectfully, a Finn.

Kallioapina ,
@Kallioapina@lemm.ee avatar

You’re thinking of the Dutch.

Kallioapina ,
@Kallioapina@lemm.ee avatar

Having a total defence doctrine does not equal 2A fetishism and paranoia towards governments. Sorry, youre a moron, and morons are not welcome to Finland. Larp your power fantasies in the states, that kind of bs is frowned upon here.

Kallioapina ,
@Kallioapina@lemm.ee avatar

Fucking Serbian Film. And eff your post for reminding my stupid brain that that film exists. /s

How do people find good information on the internet these days?

It used to be that you would do a search on a relevant subject and get blog posts, forums posts, and maybe a couple of relevant companies offering the product or service. (And if you wanted more information on said company you could give them a call and actually talk to a real person about said service) You could even trust...

Kallioapina ,
@Kallioapina@lemm.ee avatar

I’ve started doing the same, but instead I keep a “personal wiki” .docx -document. Updating that is less frustrating than realizing again and again that you can’t find the thing you found a month earlier, using the same search terms, because of SEO optimization and other random bullshit thats apparently going on under the hood.

Kallioapina ,
@Kallioapina@lemm.ee avatar

I havent, but I’ll be sure to check them out if they could be usefull to me. Thanks for the tip!

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