Linux

maiskanzler , in VLC Media Player Plans to Add Online Media Streaming

Changes are looking good, great to see it is still very active!

wick3dr0se , in Which one do you prefer? htop, btop or top?

I'm more of a bottom guy myself

Sickday ,
Sickday avatar

Thanks for the share. Never heard of this until now and the Temperature Sensor and Disk Utilization widgets are awesome.

StrawberryPigtails , in I feel like I'm taking crazy pills

Linux is a slightly different way of thinking. There are any number of ways that you can solve any problem you have. In Windows there are usually only one or two that work. This is largely a result of the hacker mentality from which linux and Unix came from. "If you don't like how it works, rewrite it your way" and "Read the F***ing Manual" were frequent refrains when I started playing with linux.

Mint is a fine distro which is based off of Ubuntu, if I remember correctly. Most documentation that applies to Ubuntu will also apply to you.

Not sure what exactly you installed, but I'm guessing that you did something along the lines of sudo apt-get install docker.

If you did that without doing anything ahead of time, what you probably got was a slightly out of date version of docker only from Mint's repositories. Follow the instructions here to uninstall whatever you installed and install docker from docker's own repositories.

The Docker Desktop that you may be used to from Windows is available for linux, however it is not part of the default install usually. You might look at this documentation.

I don't use it, as I prefer ctop combined with docker-compose.

Towards that end, here is my docker-compose.yaml for my instance of Audiobookshelf. I have it connected to my Tailscale tailnet, but if you comment out the tailscale service stuff and uncomment the port section in the audiobookshelf service, you can run it directly. Assuming your not making any changes,

Create a directory somewhere,

mkdir ~/docker

mkdir ~/docker/audiobookshelf

This creates a directory in your home directory called docker and then a directory within that one called audiobookshelf. Now we want to enter that directory.

cd ~/docker/audiobookshelf

Then create your docker compose file

touch docker-compose.yaml

You can edit this file with whatever text editor you like, but I prefer micro which you may not have installed.

micro docker-compose.yaml

and then paste the contents into the file and change whatever setting you need to for your system. At a minimum you will need to change the volumes section so that the podcast and audiobook paths point to the correct location on your system. it follows the format <system path>:<container path>.

Once you've made all the needed changes, save and exit the editor and start the the instance by typing

sudo docker compose up -d

Now, add the service directly to your tailnet by opening a shell in the tailscale container

sudo docker exec -it audiobookshelf-tailscale /bin/sh

and then typing

tailscale up

copy the link it gives you into your browser to authenticate the instance.
Assuming that neither you or I made any typos you should now be able to access audiobookshelf from http://books
If you chose to comment out all the tailscale stuff you would find it at http://localhost:13378

docker-compose.yaml

version: "3.7"
services:
  tailscale:
    container_name: audiobookshelf-tailscale
    hostname: books                         # This will become the tailscale device name
    image: ghcr.io/tailscale/tailscale:latest
    volumes:
      - "./tailscale_var_lib:/var/lib"        # State data will be stored in this directory
      - "/dev/net/tun:/dev/net/tun"           # Required for tailscale to work
    cap_add:                                    # Required for tailscale to work
      - net_admin
      - sys_module
    command: tailscaled
    restart: unless-stopped
  audiobookshelf:
    container_name: audiobookshelf
    image: ghcr.io/advplyr/audiobookshelf:latest
    restart: unless-stopped
#    ports:                                                                  # Not needed due to tailscale
#      - 13378:80                                                                                                     
    volumes:
      - '/mnt/nas/old_media_server/media/books/Audio Books:/audiobooks'       # This line has quotes because there is a space that needed to be escaped.
      - /mnt/nas/old_media_server/media/podcasts:/podcasts                               # See, no quotes needed here, better to have them though.
      - /opt/audiobookshelf/config:/config                                       # I store my docker services in the /opt directory. You may want to change this to './config' and './metadata' while your playing around
      - /opt/audiobookshelf/metadata:/metadata
    network_mode: service:tailscale                                  # This line tells the audiobookshelf container to send all traffic to tailscale container

I've left my docker-compose file as-is so you can see how it works in my setup.

Kecessa ,

👆

And that is why Linux mass adoption is never coming.

velox_vulnus ,
@velox_vulnus@lemmy.ml avatar

Docker is not your average GUI text editor or video player. It is supposed to be a TUI-first container app, similar to Podman, Incus, etc. The GUI applet is something you can add for your convenience.

A container is somewhere between running on bare metal vs virtual machine, in the sense that it is an ephemeral, isolated system, running on the same kernel with minimal overhead.

Docker for Windows runs the whole Linux kernel in VM. Basically, now you're running a container inside a VM. That's a lot of overhead, if you understand what that means. And btw, the desktop app for Windows is available on Linux. It's just that you don't really need it.

StrawberryPigtails ,

It's not as difficult as the length of my comment implies, and doing it in the terminal simplifies the explanation quite a bit.

The average user though might never need to use the terminal. Most of what they want can be done in the browser.

As for Linux mass adoption, that happened years ago. Just nobody noticed. Android, Chromebook, Steam Deck are all Linux based and MacOS (BSD derived) is a close relative. And Microsoft has even made it possible to run linux command line programs in Windows, with some caveats, using WSL. And that's not counting the majority of servers, networking gear and space craft running linux or unix.

Kecessa ,

"They're all close relatives"

on which the experience has been tuned to make them as user friendly as possible to the point where they have nothing in common with desktop Linux from an average user perspective.

StrawberryPigtails ,

And blackbox has nothing in common with KDE? /s

Im off for bed. Night.

Nibodhika ,

Getting this setup on Windows would be even harder because it would involve installing docker manually or setting up WSL and following these steps. What OP is trying to do is a complex thing that most people don't need, that would be the same as saying Windows is hard because setting up a VM with hardware passthrough is difficult on Windows, completely missing the point that that is a complex thing to do and that it's complex on any other OS as well.

Kecessa ,

Yeah but the difference is that even for simple things, Linux instructions look like what was posted by the person I replied to.

Nibodhika ,

Being a person who replies to lots of new users questions I strongly disagree. 99% of the questions come from a Windows mindset, so it requires some deconstruction of the way the person is thinking, have you noticed how very few Mac users ask beginner questions on Linux forums?

There's a big difference between something is different and someone is used to doing the things differently, driving on the left or right is just as difficult, bit if you've driven all of your life one way switching up can be difficult. Just like that a lot of Linux concepts are different from what people are used to if they come from a Windows background, but the same is true the other way around. As someone who's been using Linux for decades I find windows weird and convoluted, but I know that this is just my perception, and that someone who's using it daily is used to that.

Edit: if you're going to reply to this, mind providing an example of something you think is easy on Windows but hard on Linux?

Para_lyzed ,

Just to be clear, I agree with you practically 100%, and you can see my response to this person in the same thread as well, but I'm going to play devil's advocate here. I'll give you a few examples of things that are easier on Windows (and most also are easier on MacOS) than they are on Linux (or at least some distros depending on which you pick):

  • Using proprietary multimedia codecs (Fedora)
  • Installing Nvidia drivers that have the capability of auto-updating (any distro that doesn't have a GUI for driver downloads)
  • Installation (most people simply use the pre-installed OS and never reinstall or install anything new)
  • Game compatibility (Linux gaming is great, but there are still major titles not supported)
  • Accessing firmware settings and profiles for laptops while booted (like Armoury Crate for Asus laptops (yes, I know about rog-control-center and asusctl, but those don't work for all devices, and are harder to set up))

There are probably plenty more, and there are things that are easier on Linux. But again, I'm just playing devil's advocate here. Each of those examples are less intuitive to complete on Linux (or at least some distros) than they are in Windows. As someone who has been using Linux for a decade, I don't think that they are all hard, but many are also less intuitive in Linux than MacOS, just to address your first point. When you have to start adding PPAs/repos to get specific things, I'd argue that's objectively less intuitive than the alternatives in other operating systems, and not merely a different way of thinking. In many cases though, for most things, there are intuitive solutions that exist in Linux. There are plenty of cases where someone overcomplicates something they want to do in Linux by using a Windows mindset, so I still agree with you there. I just think it's a little more nuanced than you seemed to imply.

Nibodhika ,

I had written a more thorough response, but the app crashed and I lost it. Sorry of this one sounds a bit harsh, I do mostly agree with you, I just think that the examples you've chosen are bad because they're either distro specific (so not a Linux problem but a problem with that distro), or not Linux problems (i.e. there's nothing Linux can do about it because the problem doesn't lie on Linux but elsewhere)

Using proprietary multimedia codecs (Fedora)

Distro specific. It should be just like installing anything else, and it is for some distros, certainty for the ones I've been using.

Installing Nvidia drivers that have the capability of auto-updating (any distro that doesn't have a GUI for driver downloads)

Distro specific, I've had NVIDIA drivers auto-updating for the past 15 years or so, long before Windows had that same capabilities. And it updates with my regular system update, no need to use any special GUI for it.

Installation (most people simply use the pre-installed OS and never reinstall or install anything new)

Not Linux problem. Also, while I can see the argument that's easier to use what's already installed, that tells you nothing of how easy one thing is in comparison to the other. If computers came with the most convolutedly complex and unusable crap of an OS, full of bloatware and spyware pre-installed people would still use it. Not to mention that the Linux installation process was much easier than Windows for the longest time (until windows finally implemented automatic driver installation)

Game compatibility (Linux gaming is great, but there are still major titles not supported)

Not Linux problem. Although this is something to bear in mind while choosing your OS, it's the companies that make games that are at fault here, there's nothing Linux can do to remedy this situation, so it's unfair to judge it for it. That's like saying Windows is harder to use because running docker containers in it is impossible without some virtualisation, while this is something to consider when deciding what OS will you use to self-host, it's not per-se a reason why Windows is more difficult to use.

Accessing firmware settings and profiles for laptops while booted (like Armoury Crate for Asus laptops (yes, I know about rog-control-center and asusctl, but those don't work for all devices, and are harder to set up))

Same as above.

Like I said, I agree with lots of what you said, and some of those are thing to keep in mind when choosing an OS, but those are not good arguments as for which OS is simpler than the other. The Linux way to do most of them is using the package manager, and that's much simpler than searching the internet for the correct download.

yianiris ,
@yianiris@kafeneio.social avatar

The greatest contribution of Nvidia to FOSS had been to keep many such thinking people hostage to proprietary solutions and out of our visibility.

You know, those that refuse to learn anything new, refuse to read documents, believe that by controlling input/output through terminal is inferior to gui-blindness.

@Nibodhika @Para_lyzed

Nibodhika ,

Yes NVIDIA is crap which is why my next GPU will not be NVIDIA. However you need to remember AMD used to be crappier, and the last time I bought a GPU I still didn't trusted AMD.

Also not sure what your answer has to do with the ongoing discussion.

yianiris ,
@yianiris@kafeneio.social avatar

Auto downloading and installing software is pretty much a violation of ethics in the unix ecosystem, pretty much anything that begins with Auto should be rejected.

But the general public wants the convenience and luxury of having things done by others without being bothered. Many distros competing with each other for lazy newcomers (ubuntu, mint, debian, manjaro, ...) they provide all those non-unix like utilities.

Lately it is getting worse, all sorts of telemtry is branded good

@Nibodhika

Nibodhika ,

I assume you're talking about the "auto-update" drivers. That's pretty standard Linux thing, everything "auto" updates when you tell your system to update, that's one of the huge advantages of package managers, not sure which Linux have you used, but the vast majority of them do have a package manager that updates everything (including drivers).

yianiris ,
@yianiris@kafeneio.social avatar

I have never used such a system, I don't know of a single one, and I wouldn't use such a system.

@Nibodhika

Nibodhika ,

Would you mind telling us which obscure Linux distro do you use that doesn't have a package manager? And how do you update your system?

yianiris ,
@yianiris@kafeneio.social avatar

I have used apt apt-get, apk, pacman, xbps, and I have never encountered an auto-update

Even dumb-gui like synaptics or pamac don't auto-update

@Nibodhika

Nibodhika ,

All of those upgrade the drivers when you upgrade your system just like I mentioned.

yianiris ,
@yianiris@kafeneio.social avatar

Then what you consider automatic is a very unique perception of how things work.
In a car automatic transmission means it shifts on its own.
In a non automatic either you shift or it doesn't happen.

On most pkg managers YOU elect when to upgrade, the output is a list of "upgradable" pkgs, then you are asked whether to proceed or not. Nothing automatic about this.

Auto update would mean software has been updated on its own without you authorizing it.

@Nibodhika

Nibodhika ,

No it's not, every sane person considers automatic to have little or no human interaction, but some human interaction to trigger the flow is still a thing, next you'll tell me that an automatic weapon fires on it's own will, or that an automatic garage door decides when to open. A single command that updates all of your system seems pretty automated to me, if not try doing your next update manually by downloading every single package from their source, compiling it if needed, and copying it into the correct folders, do that for every one of the hundreds of packages that get updates and then tell me that a single command is not automating a lot of that away for you.

It doesn't even work how you're describing in Windows, you get prompted whether you want to update there.

Para_lyzed ,

It seems you misunderstand what the other commenter meant. By "auto-update", they mean that the package is fetched and updated when you request your package manager to perform an update/upgrade (meaning that the user specifically requested the packages be updated, not that it happened on its own). This comes from my use of the term "auto-updating" in reference to Nvidia drivers on Windows, which will automatically check for updates on boot, in comparison to the closest equivalent with Linux distros in which the drivers would be updated by the package manager (but still do not require the user to manually install a new version separately, as would be the case if trying to use Nvidia's official runfile installer). I grouped the Linux drivers from a package manager into the "auto-update" category, which I realize in hindsight is a bit confusing given the nature of updating through a package manager.

Para_lyzed , (edited )

I do agree with you that these problems are not the fault of Linux, but I never meant to imply that they were. The average PC user has absolutely zero care for where the fault is, the only thing that matters to them as an end user is their experience while using the operating system. Users who actually care about the quality and ethics of the software they use are likely to already be using Linux anyway, but that is very much not the norm. The layperson is perfectly happy to never care or understand a single thing about their operating system. I will be answering your response to each of my points, as well as rebuttals for this:

The Linux way to do most of them is using the package manager, and that's much simpler than searching the internet for the correct download.

in the following:

Distro specific. It should be just like installing anything else, and it is for some distros, certainty for the ones I've been using.

They are pre-installed in Windows. In fact, most people won't even understand why their media isn't playing, and won't even know that they need to install something, or how to install it. Some distros have them pre-installed, but there are plenty that do not. The point here is that it is inherently less intuitive and more difficult in Linux than in Windows.

This doesn't require installing anything in Windows. This is purely easier in Windows for many distributions, and equal at best for those who have them installed by default. Thus using the package manager is not easier or more intuitive in this sense, especially since the packages have strange names (so you'd have to look up how to do it as a new user).

Distro specific, I've had NVIDIA drivers auto-updating for the past 15 years or so, long before Windows had that same capabilities. And it updates with my regular system update, no need to use any special GUI for it.

Nvidia's driver software comes pre-installed in a lot of pre-built systems nowadays. It has automatic update checking so it will prompt you on boot to ask if you want to update. Even if it didn't come pre-installed (which is also the case with most Linux distros), Windows users don't have to look up a tutorial on how to download and install the drivers. In Linux, the package names and installation methods vary so greatly between distros, that I still have to look it up every time I set up a new distro, even with a decade of Linux experience. In either case, the user will need to use the Internet to search for a page (either the Nvidia driver site, or a tutorial for how to do it on their distro). And no, I'm not talking about Nouveau here, it still has lots of issues and delivers much worse performance than the proprietary driver. Sure, using an AMD card is easier, but the current market share suggests most people will be coming over with Nvidia hardware.

When all the first results are the Nvidia website with official driver downloads, and don't require the user to use the terminal (and make sure the tutorial works for their distro), Windows is easier there. You just download an executable and run it. No need to add non-free repositories to your package manager, no need to use the terminal, just a search, 4 clicks, and you're done. Yes, it's a very "Windows way to do things", but it's also objectively easier than it is in a variety of Linux distros. A select few distros have a GUI way to manage this, which I'd rate as slightly easier than the manual Windows way, but still more difficult than the "this is already installed on my system" way that's the case for many pre-builts and laptops.

Not Linux problem. Also, while I can see the argument that's easier to use what's already installed, that tells you nothing of how easy one thing is in comparison to the other. If computers came with the most convolutedly complex and unusable crap of an OS, full of bloatware and spyware pre-installed people would still use it. Not to mention that the Linux installation process was much easier than Windows for the longest time (until windows finally implemented automatic driver installation)

You seem to have answered this for me. People will use what is pre-installed on their system because it is easier for them to do so. Again, not the fault of Linux, but it adds a layer of difficulty to those who want to switch. The layperson doesn't know what an ISO image is, or how to make a liveUSB out of one.

This has nothing to do with using a package manager or the "Linux way to do things".

Not Linux problem. Although this is something to bear in mind while choosing your OS, it's the companies that make games that are at fault here, there's nothing Linux can do to remedy this situation, so it's unfair to judge it for it. That's like saying Windows is harder to use because running docker containers in it is impossible without some virtualisation, while this is something to consider when deciding what OS will you use to self-host, it's not per-se a reason why Windows is more difficult to use.

Most end users will not care whose fault it is. The fact of the matter is that it will dissuade a large portion of gamers away from Linux, as Riot games don't run at all. It's much more difficult to convince someone that they should switch to another operating system when the games they play or programs they use (like Adobe software) won't work. Sure, in many cases there are alternatives, but that's a massive layer of difficulty, especially if you're expecting people to learn new, alternative software with equally steep or steeper learning curves than the Adobe suite, or give up games they've been playing for years.

Again, nothing to do with a package manager or the "Linux way to do things".

Same as above.

Again, the end user doesn't care whose fault it is. If they can't access the features their laptop or PC came with (like the ability to use their discrete GPU), then that's going to be a hard sell. And even if they can by installing something like rog-control-center, that is still another layer of difficulty.

If there is a solution available for a specific computer, it is inherently more difficult on Linux. The computer will come pre-installed with the correct software (no download necessary), and even if you were to reinstall, all you have to do is download a single executable and run it. On Linux, however, you have to research and figure out what kind of software would even do this (asusctl or rog-control-center, for instance), then you have to check the model number of your laptop or motherboard for compatibility because only a select few will be compatible, then you have to add a PPA/repo to your package manager (if the solution even has that available; some will require you to build from source and/or update manually every update), and only then can you install the package. Far more steps, far less intuitive, and far more difficult for an average user.

I gave you examples of things that are more difficult in Linux than Windows. None of these things have to do with a difference in perspective on how to install software, or an investment in the "Windows way" to do things. I've been using Linux for around a decade, and I've had recent experience with each of these things in Windows while helping other people. They are simply easier in Windows. I want to again make it clear that I never said any of these were the fault of Linux, but you can't merely overlook them simply because Linux isn't at fault. New users would still want/have to do these things, and doing them can be difficult or impossible depending on compatibility. There are plenty of arguments for Linux, but the argument that it is simpler or easier in any overarching sense is not one of them. There are very specific instances where things are easier in Linux, or the experience of a user is simpler in Linux, but those few cases do not encompass the entirety of Linux. You have said yourself that you have not used Windows recently, and that seems very apparent to me. I dislike Windows, but Linux has not gotten anywhere near a point where one of my recommendations for switching to Linux are that it is easier or simpler.

I agree that the package manager is a much better solution than the Windows way of doing things, but it has nothing to do with most of the points I made.

Adanisi ,
@Adanisi@lemmy.zip avatar

No they don't lol

Para_lyzed ,

This is a discussion about Docker, which is a complex terminal-based containerization system. This is not a program that is typically used by the average user. Docker's complexity does not imply that Linux requires this kind of set up to use as a normal desktop. This is usually server software. Docker is also available on Windows and MacOS, and is partnered with Microsoft (you know, the company that makes Windows? The desktop OS with the highest market share?). Are you going to complain about how Windows will never reach mass adoption because users are able to install complex tools that require a steep learning curve to use? You can install Docker on Windows and use the same commands and configs, so do you believe that Windows suffers this same problem?

Before you point out the start of that comment with the "Linux mentality" stuff, while some of that is certainly true, you can now do everything an average user needs to do in an intuitive GUI, just like Windows (better in many cases, actually). Half the listed commands (making directories and files) can be done in the file manager just like Windows, normal apps can be managed in app stores, and the rest of it is docker specific, which is (again), server-oriented software. I'm not a fan of their mentality about how things work in Linux, because it's very much an old mentality that doesn't account for the immense amount of change that has happened in the past decade to make Linux more accessible.

I don't understand why people come to the Linux communities to complain that Linux is "too hard" or "too complex" to be usable. If you don't have an actual interest in Linux, find another community. If you want a simple experience, use a simple distro that's meant to be easy to use, and use software that is easy to use.

foobaz ,

😅

Adanisi ,
@Adanisi@lemmy.zip avatar

Because Docker, a complex program most users will never use, has a long install process?

If I posted the long setup instructions for it on Windows, would you tell me Windows mass adoption is never coming?

Kecessa ,

Because instructions like these are just standard procedure for Linux.

Adanisi ,
@Adanisi@lemmy.zip avatar

Except, no they're not. Not anymore.

Lojcs , in [kind of solved] Nvidia Wayland Issues

Roll back your drivers to 535 if you're on 545. 545 is broken

limitedduck ,

Is 545 still the latest? That release was so awful it made me completely drop Nvidia and pick up an AMD card. Fixed so many issues

Lojcs ,

Yep. 550 is in beta but it's unclear if it fixes things

limitedduck ,

Wow, I'm glad I switched back in early December. What a nightmare it would be to still have those problems

hirad ,

I’m curious how awful exactly. Been using 545 since it was released (on Arch) and except for frame drop on X11, on Wayland it’s working flawlessly and I’m even playing games on it!

Lojcs ,

When I tried it games would flicker like crazy with black frames

limitedduck ,

Like the other commenter I also had wildly flickering frames. Overwatch in particular was stuttering back to some previously buffered frame when the framerate was either below or above a sweet spot. I was also having issues with KDE Plasma bars that I assumed was a KDE issue, but they went away with the new GPU with no other software changes than swapping drivers. I was on a GTX 1080 which was still going strong with the games I played

Hyperreality , in I dislike wayland

I sounds like you don't actually dislike wayland, but fanboys and toxicity. TBH the linux community is full of that kind of crap.

Imagine if we were all as weird about toasters, having arguments about how toaster brand X was so much better than toaster brand Y.

But luckily people don't give much of a shit about toasters, as long as they work.

Infiltrated_ad8271 ,
@Infiltrated_ad8271@kbin.social avatar

I join the anti-fanboy club. I hate that I can't mention the problems it causes me without them interpreting that I'm attacking their worship.

stevecrox , in Switched from Ubuntu to Debian yesterday

The splash screen (boot screen instead of text)used to get me. It provided by an application called 'Plymouth'.

You used to need to install it and configure grub, however I think if you go into 'System Settings' and type 'Splash' KDE has an option to install and choose the screen

haui_lemmy OP ,
@haui_lemmy@lemmy.giftedmc.com avatar

Very interesting! Thanks for sharing that. Will probably read up a lot.

EponymousBosh , in (Constructively) What is your least favorite distro & why?
@EponymousBosh@beehaw.org avatar

My least favorite is Linux Lite. It's supposed to be a lighter, simpler version of Ubuntu but I don't think it accomplishes this at all. It's very slow for something that's supposed to be lightweight, and still includes Snaps, which are also very much not lightweight. Plus its software center is just bad, which is not great for something that's marketed at Linux noobs. Linux Mint XFCE or SpiralLinux are better options for a Linux noob who needs a lighter distro, IMO.

An improvement I'd suggest: obviously, ditch Snaps. Another would be to take a look at what Bodhi Linux does and have the "software center" run in the browser. I don't know how good this is security-wise, but it definitely speeds things up from the UX side of things.

BiggestBulb ,
BiggestBulb avatar

Yes, this was my experience as well. Linux Lite was literally heavier-weight than Mint on my machine (probably due to the snaps)

bionicjoey , in The 6.7 kernel has been released

We are only two minor versions away from a very nice milestone.

CameronDev ,

Just to upset you, the next 2 versions are 6.8, and 9.0.

bionicjoey ,

Linus is a coward

PainInTheAES ,

Let's make a petition. Kernel version 6.9.420 must be free!

ryannathans ,

6.8 to 9.0 would upset a lot of people

shotgun_crab ,

No way we switched to microsoft versioning :o

itslilith ,
@itslilith@lemmy.blahaj.zone avatar

What happened to 7 and 8?

CameronDev ,

Those were skipped to upset you :D

jalda ,
@jalda@sopuli.xyz avatar

Same as Windows 9

caseyweederman ,

Seven is spending a very long time in jail for cannibalism.

NuclearDolphin ,

7 ate 9

survivalmachine ,

6.6.6 was rad while it lasted.

unique_hemp ,

Was very short on Arch :(

anothermember ,

4.20 still feels like yesterday

TheGrandNagus ,

69, interrupted with a period?

bjoern_tantau , in Kernel 6.6.6 is out 😈
@bjoern_tantau@swg-empire.de avatar

We need a petition to make this LTS.

PHLAK ,
@PHLAK@lemmy.world avatar

Long Term Satan?

walthervonstolzing ,
@walthervonstolzing@lemmy.ml avatar

No, because he has already sent the beast with wrath.
— because he knows the time is short.

In any case, let him who have understanding
reckon the kernel of the beast;
for it is a human number;
not a semver number. So don't worry about it. \

yieeeeeeaaaaaaaahhh

ademir ,
@ademir@lemmy.eco.br avatar

for it is a human number;

for it is a binary number
its number is 0000001010011010

amanneedsamaid , in Plan on getting a Linux laptop: any suggestions?

Im happy with my ROG Zephyrus G14, which I only chose because of decent linux compatibility and a sale at Best Buy.

I would say when judging the price of a laptop, whether it is Windows focused or Linux focused, make your decision based off of mainly hardware specs (and that hardwares linux compatibility). For example (assuming same price), if a Windows laptop has a great AMD CPU and GPU, I would take that over a Linux laptop with an equivalent CPU but an NVIDIA GPU.

My best advice is to read posts / watch videos of people using / installing / reviewing Linux on said hardware before you buy it. For instance, Asus ROG laptops (like I have) require a program called asusctl to control certain aspects of the machine that are usually controlled by Asus’s proprietary software. I would not have known this if not for researching beforehand.

EDIT: I agree with another comment, used Thinkpads are awesome and usually old enough that there will be next to no compatibility issues with Linux. Also, they’re tanks!

PurrJPro OP ,
@PurrJPro@beehaw.org avatar

Ooo, nice! And yeah, buying a laptop without knowing for sure Linux is compatible would be a very bad idea, lol. As for ThinkPads, I’m highly considering getting one simply because of the price point, but used/refurbished stuff can be a bit of a gamble if it’s from somebody who isn’t credible

amanneedsamaid ,

Thinkpads are a particularly solid option for used, as a lot of businesses buy them in bulk and they end up on resell sites (in better condition than most consumer used models). Like you said, just has to be a credible reseller.

PurrJPro OP ,
@PurrJPro@beehaw.org avatar

They seem pretty nice, and I’m pretty sure it’s the best route to go down for now. I’ll probably look for some credible sellers later and make my decision then

MonkderDritte , in Leap Micro 6 Enters Alpha Stage

Replace "Leap Micro" with a random word and you sill don't know more.

So, what is Leap Micro?

LiveLM , in A Brief Review of the Minisforum V3 AMD Tablet

Dammit, I really wish I could get this in my country. I love the tablet form factor and it ticks all the boxes I want for my next laptop :(

Limeade3425 , in What do you use Waydroid for?
@Limeade3425@lemmy.one avatar

I haven't gotten to it, but I'd like to try and set it up as an android TV replacement. Just have distro of choice load on boot with Bluetooth remote/controller for input

MonkderDritte , in Did you ever try Bedrock Linux ?

No.

Atemu , in dfコマンドはどこからファイルシステムの統計を取得するのか - Plan 9とGo言語のブログ
@Atemu@lemmy.ml avatar

Why is this being downvoted? It's clearly labelled as Japanese; if you don't want to see foreign languages, filter them out.

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